Patrick Schreiner on the Theology of the Book of Acts (Season 2, Episode 2)

2 weeks ago 18

This article is part of the Conversations on the Bible with Nancy Guthrie series.

Digging into the Theology of Acts

Join Nancy Guthrie as she talks with professor and author Patrick Schreiner about the uniqueness of the book of Acts and the theological themes of the plan of God, the word of God, and the kingdom of God that are woven throughout the entire book.

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Nancy Guthrie

Saved, by bestselling author Nancy Guthrie, gives individuals and small groups a friendly, theologically reliable, and robust guide to understanding the book of Acts.

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Topics Addressed in This Interview:

00:51 - What Makes the Book of Acts Unique?

Nancy Guthrie
Welcome to season two of Conversations on the Bible with Nancy Guthrie. I’m Nancy Guthrie, author of Saved: Experiencing the Promise of the Book of Acts. In the book of Acts, we see the enthroned Lord Jesus at work by his Spirit through the apostles. They are taking the message that salvation is available to all who will call upon the name of the Lord to Jerusalem, Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth. And it is accomplishing its intended purpose—people are being saved. On this podcast, I’m having conversations with people who can help us to see more clearly the ways in which we see God working out his salvation purposes in the world, particularly in the pages of the book of Acts. My guest today is Dr. Patrick Schreiner. Patrick Schreiner is the director of the residency PhD program and associate professor of New Testament and Biblical theology (that’s a really long title, Patrick) at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Kansas City, Missouri. He previously taught at Western Seminary in Portland, Oregon, and he received his PhD from the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. He’s the author of a number of books, including several that have import to our discussion on Acts. He’s got a new commentary from Broadman & Holman on the book of Acts, which was a real service to me in working on this book. He’s the author of a shorter but meaty little book called The Mission of the Triune God: A Theology of Acts. Much of our conversation today is going to flow out of that book. And then I had to mention a recent book he wrote on the ascension of Christ. This is one of the things I love about Patrick. He is out to get us thinking and to raise the profile of the ascension of Christ. So maybe we’ll talk about that a little bit too, Patrick. And he also serves as an elder at Emmaus Church in North Kansas City. So I love watching his Twitter feed because I see on that, Patrick, the many things that you do and the ways you invest yourself. So thank you for being willing to have this conversation with us on Acts.

Patrick Schreiner
Thanks, Nancy. So good to see you and talk to you about this book, Acts. I love Acts so much, and it’s a book I just continually come back to and I’m always amazed by it and amazed by the story we see there. So I’m excited to talk to you more about it.

Nancy Guthrie
Oh, good. Why don’t we just start with a very general question. Acts is kind of a unique book in the New Testament. So when I say that, maybe I have some ideas about what makes it unique. I’d love to hear from you. What makes the book of Acts unique, in your mind?

Patrick Schreiner
It’s the only book that we have that tells the story of the early church. You might think, Well, wait a second. We get some of that in Paul’s epistles, but those are little snapshots of what’s going on in the early church. We don’t have that big narrative of what happened in the early church except in Acts. And so one way I even like to think about it in terms of the whole Bible is that for the whole Bible, we’ve been waiting in the Old Testament for Jesus to come. And in the Gospels, he arrives, and that tells the story. But Acts begins this new phase in the biblical storyline where the church, God’s people, need to figure out, What do we do now that he’s come and gone? And so it’s the first what we could say canonically post-Jesus book where this group of Jesus followers are figuring out now that Jesus has ascended, now that he’s died on the cross, now that he’s been raised from the dead, what’s our mission now? What are we to do now that he’s gone? And you really see in the book of Acts what happens at a large level. They’re called to be witnesses, obviously, Acts 1:8. And I think a lot of times I just like to put it this way for people: we have one mission once Christ is gone, and that is to be witnesses. That’s our one job to do here—to glorify our God by being a witness to him and telling others of the salvation that Jesus has brought. So you can even think, though, in terms of individual narratives. We wouldn’t have the story of Pentecost. We wouldn’t have the story of Cornelius, the first Gentile that’s saved, in some sense, at least that’s how it’s portrayed. And you wouldn’t have the story of Paul’s visits to Philippi Ephesus. Now, we know he went there from the books that he wrote to some of those churches, but you get the background narrative, which is so fun, I think, to see the big picture story. And so there’s so much we could say, but man, if we didn’t have Acts, it’s the bridge between the Gospels and the epistles. It’s the thing that kind of links the two together. It continues the story of Jesus in one sense because he’s still reigning, but it really begins to focus on the followers of Jesus and what they do and, I think, how they imitate their Savior. They go through the same things that Jesus does. And so I think it’s so important that it’s in our canon. It’s so important that God sovereignly preserved this book for us. And it’s such an encouragement for us as we are living in the same days, I think, according to the Scriptures that Acts was written in. It’s in the last days. It’s post Jesus’s life, and we are still the same people of God who are seeking to follow him in the same era. And so I think it has a lot to say to us today.

06:45 - Three Central Themes

Nancy Guthrie
In your book, The Mission of the Triune God, you talk about the plan of God, the word of God, and the kingdom of God—those three things being really central to this book. Why did you pick those three things? And are they separate things? Or do they kind of work together?

Patrick Schreiner
That comes in my chapter where I’m actually talking about the Father’s work, God the Father’s work in the book of Acts. So often when we think of Acts, we think of Acts as the Acts of the Apostles, as we know the title. And I think it’s helpful to think of these as the acts of Jesus Christ himself, or the acts of the Holy Spirit, because the Holy Spirit is mentioned so often in this book. However, I think it’s also important to include God the Father in how we view the book of Acts, because really it’s God the Father who works through the Son and through the Spirit. And so I think it’s actually super important to see what the Father is doing. And I describe what the Father is doing as his plan. It’s all according to his plan. And so it’s the plan of God to spread the word of God to establish the kingdom of God. So that’s the interconnection. It’s the plan of God to spread the word of God to establish the kingdom of God. And if you really look through the book of Acts, you can see again and again this is the plan of God to send the Holy Spirit, to have Jesus crucified, to raise him up, to establish this new people of God. Maybe the most important text for the plan of God is that text in Acts 5 with Gamaliel who stands up and says, I don’t really know what to do with John and Peter, but we do know that if this is according to the plan of man, it’s going to fail. But if it’s according to the plan of God, (this is Acts 5:39) then we cannot stop it. So we better just leave these guys alone. And Luke is obviously winking at his reader saying, This is according to the plan of God. You cannot stop this movement no matter what you do. And it’s such an amazing text. I love it. But I think that’s such a good text to know. Okay, the early church will be persecuted, but even that is according to the plan, and they will continue to grow because his mission is to really spread the glory of his name. And for them to hear the word of God is the word about Jesus Christ, ultimately.

Nancy Guthrie
One thing that really came clear to me as I studied this book was that the plan of God and the spread of his gospel is unstoppable. Just over and over again through the book. And I think maybe that’s a message we need today, don’t we? Because maybe we begin to think that the world is so dark, or other voices or powers somehow might have the power to silence the word of God and the advance of the gospel. And I found that a real encouragement in the book of Acts.

Patrick Schreiner
That’s right. And I think actually that’s a big reason why it was written, because you got to imagine these first Christians after Jesus has left, and they’re being thrown into prison. Some of them are being martyred, as we read about Stephen and James in Acts 12. And then Paul is traveling around. But the book ends with him in Rome in prison, and they’ve got to be wondering, Is this the plan of God? And God is showing that it’s in the midst of this that I’m actually working. So really the book is meant to be an encouragement to us that the plan of God and the suffering and the growth actually all come together in this kind of beautiful whole. So I think in that sense, the book of Acts is meant to be an encouragement to us today to say keep pressing on. God has a plan. Christ will return. And his mission is to bring more and more people into this kingdom.

10:40 - The Ascension and Resurrection Life

Nancy Guthrie
I think so often when I am teaching, I’ve often put the emphasis on—and I think to a certain degree, rightly so—the cross and resurrection. The death and resurrection of Jesus. That is so central to the gospel. Certainly, when we get to Acts, there’s a sense in which I have felt more compelled, and I wonder if you might want to make a case for this, that we don’t want to only put the emphasis on the gospel being about the death and resurrection of Jesus, but maybe we want to expand that to say that central to the message of gospel is the death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus. So why would we want to do that? Why do we want to think more broadly about our gospel message not being simply about death and resurrection but also include ascension perhaps?

Patrick Schreiner
You can see just the first Christian sermons that we hear—Acts 2, after Pentecost and after the Spirit has come—Peter gets up and he preaches a sermon, and he talks about all three of those things. He talks about the life and the death of Jesus, and he spends a long time on the resurrection of Jesus, but he makes a transition—and I think it’s around Acts 2:32, if I’m remembering correctly—he says, “This Jesus has been exalted to the right hand of the Father.” And so it’s a part of his first Christian message that it’s so central to really what’s going on here. And if you look at Acts 1, you have that famous beginning text that talks about the mission to be witnesses to Jerusalem, Judea, Samaria, and to the ends of the earth. But it’s right after that that Jesus ascends to the Father. And so for me, I started thinking about why that is so important and why these things are paired. Because you can see in the Old Testament that at the ascension—at the crowning of the king, the coronation of the king—that the mission then goes forth. And you can see that in Matthew 28 as well, when Jesus says, “All authority in heaven and earth has been given to me.” And I think that’s based on Daniel 7. And you see in Daniel 7—I’m going all over the Bible here—in Daniel 7, you can see that it’s once the Son of Man ascends that kingdoms and nations and peoples are given to him. The resurrection proclaims that Jesus lives in that forever. Amazing! But the ascension proclaims that Jesus reigns in that forever. So because of that, we have a mission to the nations to go out and tell everyone, because he’s the King not only of Israel but he’s the King of the whole universe. That’s why he’s seated in the heavens. And so now he’s calling, in a unique way, all people to himself because he’s been crowned as King over all. And so the story after the cross and after the resurrection is not over because Jesus must ascend. And in his ascent, he reigns over the church, he directs the church, and he helps the church. I think he sends the Spirit. He appears many times in the book of Acts. And so, yes, I think the ascension is just a huge part of the gospel message that often we leave off, but maybe we often leave off the resurrection too. And the resurrection is so key in the book of Acts. It’s really that the message of Acts, in some ways, could be summarized as you’re living in resurrection days now, and that’s what the apostles are doing. They’re spreading resurrection life.

Nancy Guthrie
Let’s talk about that a little bit more—the resurrection being central to the book of Acts. For one thing, when Peter and later Paul are being persecuted, arrested, and they’re talking about why that has happened, their answer is always that it has to do with the resurrection of the dead. Talk to us a little bit about this term, the resurrection of the dead, that we read about in the book of Acts.

Patrick Schreiner
If I can go to the Greek for a minute, it’s actually a plural—“resurrection of the deads” in some sense. And so often you actually should think this is resurrection that begins with Jesus. Jesus is the first fruits of the resurrection (1 Cor. 15). And now that resurrection life is spread to others. One of the greatest illustrations of this is that the first act that happens after Pentecost in Acts 3 is when Peter and John go into the temple and they raise the lame man. And really, they use that term that they even raise him up, and he begins to walk. And then people get mad at them, and what does he preach about? In Acts 3, he says, “We’re serving the author and champion of life.” And he keeps speaking about Jesus’s resurrection. He goes, “We didn’t do this by our power. It’s not like we have this power”—because everyone’s looking at them thinking, What sort of magical thing did you do here? And he’s like, “No, we have the power of the resurrection,” which I think is the power of the Holy spirit upon them so that they’re spreading this resurrection life to all who would place their faith in Jesus Christ, which the lame man has done. And so again and again we see that this resurrection life is spreading. You can see it not only in that narrative but when apostles are thrown into prison. Often the doors burst open. I think that’s a resurrection scene because they’re in darkness, and then usually light comes, and they arise, in some sense, from the dead metaphorically. I think you also see that in Acts 14 when Paul’s at Lystra. He’s stoned, and the author is just like, “And Paul got up and he walked to the next town.” You don’t get up and just walk after you’ve been stoned. That doesn’t happen. These are large stones that they use to stone people. This is not just little pebbles. So that’s a type of resurrection narrative. Another example I just thought of is in Acts 27. We never know what to do with that. They’re going through this long shipwreck scene, but it’s a type of resurrection. He’s saved from the storm, and he ends up on this island. So throughout the narrative, it’s God’s resurrection life through Jesus in the Spirit that they proclaim in their messages, and that’s not just to Jews but it’s actually to Gentiles as well. You think about in Athens in Acts 17. He proclaims Jesus and the resurrection. That’s what makes them so mad. They’re like, Wait a second. This doesn’t make any sense. That was a foreign concept to the philosophers of the day. But this is the primary heart of their message was Jesus’s resurrection. And that, if we’re going to even put it in different terms, that life is available to all now. All you have to do is recognize Jesus as your Savior. And so they’re spreading good news in the midst of being persecuted. In the midst of, actually, as Paul says later, smelling of death, right? Having the aroma of death, but spreading life in the midst of that. And I just think that’s a small picture of what Christ went through himself, and they’re just imitating him.

Nancy Guthrie
What you’re talking about connects with that theological idea of now and not yet. Does it not when we’re talking about resurrection? How would you articulate how that idea connects to resurrection in this book?

Patrick Schreiner
In this book, you can see people are already, in some sense, raised to life, but we don’t have our resurrected bodies. We’re not with God forever. We’re not in the new heavens and new earth. And so this resurrection life or this resurrection age has already begun. But we still also live, and we know this in our own hearts, in the age of death. And our flesh still wars with us. So there’s death and life that are still at play in all of us. As a Christian, we have the life through the Spirit, but that life will not be brought to full completion until the last day when Jesus returns again and he then raises our bodies and transforms them once and for all. The Stephen narrative is so helpful because as he’s being stoned, he looks up into the heavens and he sees Jesus Christ sitting there—or standing there, actually. Not even sitting there; standing there. This is Jesus confirming, “This is my witness, and he will be raised to life.” And his face is shining like Moses’ and like the Son, and everyone’s amazed at Stephen. But that’s not the end of Stephen’s story. He’s just, as the rest of the New Testament says, going to sleep. He will be raised again.

Nancy Guthrie
Maybe that’s why Luke uses that word that he fell asleep rather than he died because he’s hinting to us about resurrection.

Patrick Schreiner
That’s right. I think so.

19:25 - The Work of the Holy Spirit in Acts

Nancy Guthrie
So we think about the book of Acts being very much about the Holy Spirit. Is it?

Patrick Schreiner
Yes, I think it is. You see the Spirit’s work, and I think often we think of the Spirit’s work just tied to mission, which it certainly is. But at the very beginning, the Spirit’s work is also tied to salvation. In Acts 2, the outpouring of the Spirit leads people to call upon the name of the Lord Jesus for their salvation (Acts 2:21). I’m thinking of Joel 2:32 as well. So the Spirit comes, and he’s creating a new covenant community, those who worship and follow God. So it’s more than about mission. It’s about mission, but it’s actually about salvation—salvation through the Spirit. The Spirit applies that salvation to us. Acts 1:8 talks about how “the Holy Spirit will come upon you and you will have power.” And I’ve always stopped at that moment in my classes and said, “When you hear the word power, what do you think of?” And for Christians, we’re like, well, that’s the power of the Holy Spirit. But they asked a question about the kingdom. And when you hear the word power and kingdom, you probably think spears, swords, shields, walls. He redefines that power there. It’s the power of the Spirit that you will have. And then you read through the rest of the book of Acts, and you say, What sort of power is the power of the Spirit? And it often has to do with your mouth, your tongue, that you can speak with boldness. And so in the midst of fear, in the midst of not knowing what the future holds, in the midst of being on trial, you have boldness to speak the name of Jesus. That’s the power that he gives them. He not only gives them that power, but the power to share their resources, to love one another. I think he flips this idea of power on its head and says this isn’t a military power. This isn’t one where you can conquer the nations. This is a power where you welcome the nations. You invite people and you don’t shut the doors on them. You actually open the doors for them. It’s a power to welcome the other. The Gentiles who are not like you. That’s the power that the Holy Spirit brings. And so it’s more of a beautiful power that the Holy Spirit brings, and I think that’s so amazing. And the book of Acts, again, as you asked in the first question, What would we not have? I didn’t even mention this. If we didn’t have the book of Acts, we wouldn’t have this narrative of seeing how the Spirit works in such beautiful ways. And that should be a great encouragement to us because that same Spirit is still working today.

21:59 - Parallels between Sinai and Pentecost

Nancy Guthrie
One of the things I read about in The Mission of the Triune God that I don’t think I read in other places was that you said there are significant parallels between Sinai—what we would read about in the book of Exodus—with Pentecost. I think that’s so interesting. So tell us what are some of those parallels? How does seeing some of those aid in our understanding of the book of Acts?

Patrick Schreiner
There are a few parallels that you could think of. I’m sure there’s more. But you could think about where it occurred. One is a mountaintop. But the other one is an upper room. You have a high place and a high place, right? The upper room. You also have the imagery on the top of the mountain. You have fire and wind and cloud. And at Pentecost, you have these tongues of fire and this wind that comes down at this high place. At Pentecost, you have the Spirit who comes. At Sinai, you have God’s Torah written, but now at Pentecost you have that Torah written on their hearts. And so you can see the Torah is now written on their hearts. You have the Spirit working in the Old Testament, in some sense, to write the Torah, but now that Torah is written on their hearts. I even think if you go back to the Jewish festivals, you have Pentecost, which occurs fifty days after the Passover. If you actually think about the relationship of Luke and Acts, the Passover is like Jesus’ death, and then what happens next? Well, it’s Pentecost, which is like Mount Sinai. So you have the Passover where Israel came out of Egypt, they walk through the Red Sea; that’s exactly like Jesus’s death. it’s our redemption. But then you come to Pentecost, and it’s this mountaintop experience where the law is then given, but that law is written on their hearts. A neat little detail, and not everyone agrees with this detail, but it’s interesting. I think that in the book of Exodus, after you have the golden calf incident, there are 3,000 people that die. And interestingly, at Pentecost you have 3,000 people that are saved. Now, maybe we’re pressing those details too much, but I think if you have all of those other connections and you start to think, Okay, maybe there’s something happening here in terms of the way they’re telling this story. Again, I’m not saying that there wasn’t 3,000 people, but I think that number is significant. You also have at Sinai all the Jews coming to gather together at this mountain, and at Pentecost you have these diaspora Jews coming together to gather in Jerusalem. And so it’s like this unification of God’s people. Now, we can go through all those things, and I think the big question is, So what? Why does that matter? Really neat factoids, but we need to know why this matters. Well, what happened at Sinai? It was a covenant ceremony where God’s people were established in a unique way. And I think in the same way, this is the new covenant ceremony. This is the new covenant ceremony where God’s new people are established. They have continuity with the people of God in the Old Testament, but they’re also distinct. And so as they’re gathering together, I would argue in Acts 2 it’s largely Jews here. There are some Gentiles there as well. But it’s reconstituting the people of God. I’m going to just go to biblical theology for a minute. If you think back, Abraham was called to be a blessing to the nations, and Israel was called to do that, and they were not able to do that. So it’s by Jesus Christ who now does that, but we then join him in that task. But he has to reconstitute us, renew us. And so that’s the ceremony of renewal. And now he says, “Go be a blessing to the nations, because you’re filled with my Spirit, because you can only do it by my Spirit.” And so I think this narrative is actually echoing Sinai to say there’s a new phase here in the biblical storyline. These are God’s new people who (this going back to Jeremiah and Ezekiel) who have the law written on their hearts. This is the new covenant that was promised in the prophets. That’s why the Spirit descends.

26:09 - The Word of God in the Book of Acts

Nancy Guthrie
That’s beautiful. I love that. You call the word a “divine actor” in the book of Acts. What do you mean by that?

Patrick Schreiner
I’m sure I took that from someone else. I’m not smart enough to come up with that. It might have been David Peterson, who wrote the commentary on Acts—in the Pillar commentary. His commentary is great because it focuses so much on the word of God. I think what he pointed out to me is that you have certain texts in the book of Acts that talk about the word of God continuing to increase and to multiply. And if you step back and you think about that (Acts 6, Acts 12, Acts 19), if you think about what the word of God is, how does something abstract like that increase and multiply? I think he’s communicating that the word of God is so connected to God himself. That’s the means by which he continues to act in this world. And so it’s multiplying and growing because it’s alive. Hebrews: “living and active” and continues to grow. And I actually ultimately think that language is going back to the Exodus generation who also grows and multiplies. You think about Exodus 1:7—the people of God grew and they multiply, they multiply, they multiply, and then Pharaoh gets really mad. Now it’s the word of God who’s growing, and I think what he’s saying is it’s the church that’s growing and multiplying. It’s the people of God who are animated by the Spirit, which is the word of God, the breath of God. And so all these things are interconnected. And so not only do you have the Father acting through the Son and through the Spirit, but the Father and the Son and the Spirit acting in and through the word of God. Which should be such a good reminder to us. We all want to have Spirit-filled churches. And I think Spirit-filled churches are word-filled churches. That’s how the book of Acts ties it together. The word comes in concert with the Spirit. And so what I want to see is I want to see Spirit-filled and word-filled churches. That’s the two things ultimately come together.

28:27 - The Restoration of the Kingdom to Israel: A Blessing to the Nations

Nancy Guthrie
That’s great. Patrick, let’s end this way. I want to go back to the beginning of the book of Acts, and there right before the ascension of Jesus you’ve got this question the disciples ask. They ask, “Will you at this time restore Israel?” And when we read how Jesus responds to that, there’s a sense in which we think we’re not even really sure that he answered their question. At least, likely not in the way that they were hoping that he would answer their question. But perhaps the book of Acts as a whole is an answer to that question. Would you say that’s the case? And in what way does the whole of the book of Acts answer that question?

Patrick Schreiner
This is such an important text (Acts 1:6–8) in the book of Acts, but it’s also a hugely debated text in terms of how Jesus answers it. There are different views on it, but I will just submit to you what I came to as I studied it. And I think it fits with the whole book. When they ask, “Lord, will you at this time restore the kingdom to Israel?” the first thing Jesus says is, “No, not yet.” Not completely at least. So we’re going back to our already not yet. And he actually begins with a “not yet.” He says, “Your timing’s a little off. It’s not for you to know the times or seasons that the Father has fixed by his own authority.” In other words, you’re expecting the kingdom to come and just fall down upon this earth and it be over right now. And what you need to know is there are things that need to happen in the meantime. So no, not yet. It’s not yet time for the fullness of the kingdom to come in. But, verse 8, Yes, now. Now is the time. “But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you, and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, Judea, Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.” In other words, the already is happening. In other words, yes, the restoration of the kingdom to Israel will proceed, but this is how it will proceed. It will proceed by the power of the Spirit coming upon you, and you will witness in Jerusalem (the center for Israel), in Judea (the larger region), in Samaria (the Samaritans, those that you don’t like, and even to the Gentiles). So here’s what you have wrong. You think it’s only going to be focused on Israel. But it’s going to be focused on the whole world. But that is the restoration of the kingdom to Israel, because as I said earlier, Israel was always called to be a blessing to the nations. So he doesn’t deny that that’s what’s happening, but he’s just saying your timing’s a little off, and the way you think it’s going to happen is a little off. So here’s what you need to know. You need to know that my plan, my purposes will take place, and the kingdom will be established. And that’s taking place in your midst, actually. The kingdom, and we didn’t even talk as much about the kingdom, the kingdom is referenced throughout the book of Acts at key places to show the kingdom of God is continuing to move forward. And I think the establishment of the church is a small picture of the establishment of the kingdom of God. But not in full. Not yet. And so he has that Acts 1:7 “no, not yet” and Acts 1:8, “Already; it is already happening right now.” This is the continuation of God’s plan. So that would be different than what some would say, that the church is a separate kind of sphere, and we have the promises to Israel and then the promises to the church. I want to say no, no, no. There’s a lot of continuity here. This is the new people of God, which includes Israel, but includes more than Israel. So this is a continuation of a plan, not a pause in the plan. And if you actually look back to the prophets, this is what Isaiah prophesied, that the Holy Spirit would come and he would renew the desert places. And maybe to end, my favorite story of this is in Acts 8 with the Ethiopian eunuch. They’re on the desert road, and they find water to be baptized. You think back to Isaiah and he says he’s going to make the deserts like springs of water. He’s going to bring water to the desert places. You see the Ethiopian eunuch, and he’s baptized and he enters the people of God. I think that is showing that this is what he predicted, that when the Messiah comes, all things will be made new.

Nancy Guthrie
I love how your mind works as you look at the Scriptures, Patrick. And I’m really grateful you would take the time to share your passion over the book of Acts with us today. Thank you.

Patrick Schreiner
Thanks, Nancy. It’s been great talking to you.


Nancy Guthrie

Nancy Guthrie teaches the Bible at her home church, Cornerstone Presbyterian Church in Franklin, Tennessee, as well as at conferences around the country and internationally, including her Biblical Theology Workshop for Women. She is the author of numerous books and the host of the Help Me Teach the Bible podcast with the Gospel Coalition. She and her husband founded Respite Retreats for couples who have faced the death of a child, and they are cohosts of the GriefShare video series. 


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